Course Description

Scientific Vocabulary and the Roots of the European Scientific Tradition, HIS 60

Trains students in the principles that will help them make sense of Greco-Latin scientific and technical vocabulary. Introduces Greco-Roman natural philosophy and its general cultural context, and explains the historical relationship of that tradition to the emergence of modern European experimental science and technology.

Key Information

Winter Quarter 2018
Instruction start date: January 8, 2018
Instruction end date: March 16, 2018
Credit: 5 quarter units / 3.33 semester units credit
UC Santa Cruz, History

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Unit Credit



UC Davis:
Unit Credit

UC Irvine:
Major Requirement: can be used as Optional Course for Minor in Medical Humanities
Course Equivalence: UCI Classics 10

UC Los Angeles:
Unit Credit

UC Merced:
Units toward degree (see your advisor)

UC Riverside:
General Education: Elective units

UC San Diego:
General Education: Warren - May be counted depending on major/PofC/AS; TMC 1 course toward lower division disciplinary breadth if noncontiguous to major

UC San Francisco:
Unit Credit

UC Santa Barbara:
Major Preparation: Likely major prep application toward lower-division History elective credit after petition

UC Santa Cruz:
General Education: PE-T

Course Fees

No course fees.

More About The Course

In this class students will learn principles that will help them to make sense of Greco-Latin scientific and technical vocabulary; as the straightforward meaning of this terminology becomes transparent, they will find it easier to remember definitions, assimilate new vocabulary and construe meanings of new words when they encounter them. The class will also introduce students to Greco-Roman natural philosophy and its general cultural context, and explain the historical relationship of that tradition to the emergence of modern European experimental science and technology and its language. Thus the course aims to provide students with both tools and context to understand the historical roots of modern science and its language.

Additional Course Information

Exam Info

Assignments will be weighted as follows to determine the final grade: Repeatable vocabulary exercises: 30%; Non-repeatable quizzes on historical “overviews” and “in-depth” essays: 20%; Weekly writing assignments: 20%; Participation in discussion groups: 10%; Final written project: 20%.

Course Creators

Charles Hedrick
Charles Hedrick, Ph.D.

Hedrick grew up Los Angeles.  After study in Cairo, Egypt and Athens, Greece, he took his BA in Classics at Pitzer College in 1978.   After further study in Athens, he took his PhD in Classics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1984.  He has taught at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, University at Buffalo, Stanford, Princeton and Oberlin College.  Since 1990 he has taught at UC Santa Cruz, where he is currently Professor in the History Department. He is author of reviews, articles, chapters and books.  His principal publications include The Decrees of the Demotionidai (Scholars' Press, now Oxford UP, 1990); History and Silence: Purge and Rehabilitation of Memory in Late Antiquity (U Texas Press, 2000) and Ancient History: Monuments and Documents (Blackwell, 2006).  He is also joint editor of Demokratia: a Conversation on Democracies, Ancient and Modern (Princeton 1996) and of the exhibition catalog, The Birth of Democracy: an Exhibition (Athens 1993). 

Charles Hedrick, Ph.D. Hedrick grew up Los Angeles.  After study in Cairo, Egypt and Athens, Greece, he took his BA in Classics at Pitzer College in 1978.   After further study in Athens, he took his PhD in Classics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1984.  He has taught at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, University at Buffalo, Stanford, Princeton and Oberlin College. ...

Charles Hedrick, Ph.D.

Hedrick grew up Los Angeles.  After study in Cairo, Egypt and Athens, Greece, he took his BA in Classics at Pitzer College in 1978.   After further study in Athens, he took his PhD in Classics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1984.  He has taught at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, University at Buffalo, Stanford, Princeton and Oberlin College.  Since 1990 he has taught at UC Santa Cruz, where he is currently Professor in the History Department. He is author of reviews, articles, chapters and books.  His principal publications include The Decrees of the Demotionidai (Scholars' Press, now Oxford UP, 1990); History and Silence: Purge and Rehabilitation of Memory in Late Antiquity (U Texas Press, 2000) and Ancient History: Monuments and Documents (Blackwell, 2006).  He is also joint editor of Demokratia: a Conversation on Democracies, Ancient and Modern (Princeton 1996) and of the exhibition catalog, The Birth of Democracy: an Exhibition (Athens 1993). 


Jennifer Lynn
Lecturer Jennifer Lynn's expertise includes Homer, Greek drama, Hellenistic and Augustan poetry; Wormen in the ancient world.  Lecturer Jennifer Lynn's expertise includes Homer, Greek drama, Hellenistic and Augustan poetry; Wormen in the ancient world. 

Instructor of Term

Charles Hedrick
hedrick@ucsc.edu

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