Course Description

Geology of National Parks, EART 3

Geologic concepts and processes responsible for shaping our national parks including mountain building, volcanic and earthquake activity, sedimentation, weathering, erosion, and glaciation. An understanding of how geology impacts our lives is emphasized. Appropriate for both science and non-science majors who wish to enhance their knowledge, enjoyment, and appreciation of our national parks.

Key Information

Winter Quarter 2018
Instruction start date: January 8, 2018
Instruction end date: March 16, 2018
Credit: 5 quarter units / 3.33 semester units credit
UC Santa Cruz, Earth and Planetary Sciences

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Unit Credit



UC Davis:
Course Equivalence: GEL 025V

UC Irvine:
General Education: II - Science and Technology

UC Los Angeles:
General Education: Physical Sciences (No Lab)

UC Merced:
Course Equivalence: ESS 012 Geology of California
Units toward degree (see your advisor)

UC Riverside:
General Education: Elective units

UC San Diego:
General Education: Warren - May be used depending on major/PofC; TMC - Clears TMC's PHYSICS GE requirement; Sixth - Analytic Methodologies; Muir - By petition, UCSC EART 3 might count in a GE sequence in natural sciences in either an environmental studies or earth sciences GE sequence for non-science majors; ERC -meets one course of natural science requirement; Revelle Natural Science by petition
Course Equivalence: SIO 16

UC San Francisco:
Unit Credit

UC Santa Barbara:
General Education: Possible Area C after petition

UC Santa Cruz:
General Education: SI

Course Video

Course Fees

None

More About The Course

Geology of National Parks Online is an activity-based class collaboratively created by three Earth Science faculty members from UC Santa Cruz, UC Davis, and UC San Diego. This course will cover introductory geologic concepts with special focus on U.S. National Parks.
Through a series of activities, assignments, mini-lectures and readings, we’ll explore how geologic processes control the landscapes and features in our parks. Along the way you'll learn about the concepts of geologic time, plate tectonics and how the rock record can be used to reconstruct the geological story of the parks.

Additional Course Information

Exam Info

Online proctoring by a vendor. ProctorU will be used at a cost of $30-35 per student for 1 midterm and 1 final exam.

Course Creators

Susan Schwartz
Prof. Schwartz's research addresses problems in earthquake seismology and active tectonics. Her interest in the mechanical behavior of the plate interface at subduction zones and in how glaciers slide along their bed has taken her to many interesting places including northern Costa Rica, New Zealand and Antarctica. Prof. Schwartz teaches introductory classes for non-science majors, classes designed for undergraduate Earth and Planetary Science majors, and graduate classes in seismology and geophysics.   Prof. Schwartz's research addresses problems in earthquake seismology and active tectonics. Her interest in the mechanical behavior of the plate interface at subduction zones and in how glaciers slide along their bed has taken her to many interesting places including northern Costa Rica, New Zealand and Antarctica. Prof. Schwartz teaches introductory classes for non-science majors, ...

Prof. Schwartz's research addresses problems in earthquake seismology and active tectonics. Her interest in the mechanical behavior of the plate interface at subduction zones and in how glaciers slide along their bed has taken her to many interesting places including northern Costa Rica, New Zealand and Antarctica. Prof. Schwartz teaches introductory classes for non-science majors, classes designed for undergraduate Earth and Planetary Science majors, and graduate classes in seismology and geophysics.  

David Osleger
David Osleger is a tenured lecturer in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at UC Davis. His research interests include the record of sea-level change, energy resources, the geology of lakes (such as Tahoe), and ancient climate history.  He teaches courses on the geology of national parks, California geology, earthquakes, environmental geology, the solar system, and ‘big history.’ David Osleger is a tenured lecturer in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at UC Davis. His research interests include the record of sea-level change, energy resources, the geology of lakes (such as Tahoe), and ancient climate history.  He teaches courses on the geology of national parks, California geology, earthquakes, environmental geology, the solar system, and ‘big history.’
Jeff Gee

Jeff Gee serves as the deputy director for research at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and is a professor of geophysics in Scripps’ Geosciences Research Division. Gee’s research focuses on the use of magnetic data, both remotely sensed magnetic anomaly data and the magnetization of rock samples, to understand a variety of geological problems. He uses the magnetic record in geological samples to study topics ranging from the formation of new crust at oceanic spreading centers to the processes of melt redistribution and cooling in large magma chambers. Gee is particularly interested in using marine magnetic anomaly data and complementary data from seafloor samples to document past fluctuations in geomagnetic intensity. Such records of variations of the geomagnetic field, both in direction and intensity, can potentially provide important constraints on the geodynamic and thermal history of the earth. Gee is also interested in characterizing geomagnetic field behavior in the more distant past through sampling older rocks from a variety of terrestrial settings. Gee received his undergraduate degrees from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA and his Ph.D. from Scripps. He worked for three years as a postdoctoral fellow and researcher at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory before returning to Scripps. 
Gee has served as Director of the Geosciences Research Division and Head of Scripps Earth Section.

Jeff Gee serves as the deputy director for research at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and is a professor of geophysics in Scripps’ Geosciences Research Division. Gee’s research focuses on the use of magnetic data, both remotely sensed magnetic anomaly data and the magnetization of rock samples, to understand a variety of geological problems. He uses the magnetic record ...

Jeff Gee serves as the deputy director for research at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and is a professor of geophysics in Scripps’ Geosciences Research Division. Gee’s research focuses on the use of magnetic data, both remotely sensed magnetic anomaly data and the magnetization of rock samples, to understand a variety of geological problems. He uses the magnetic record in geological samples to study topics ranging from the formation of new crust at oceanic spreading centers to the processes of melt redistribution and cooling in large magma chambers. Gee is particularly interested in using marine magnetic anomaly data and complementary data from seafloor samples to document past fluctuations in geomagnetic intensity. Such records of variations of the geomagnetic field, both in direction and intensity, can potentially provide important constraints on the geodynamic and thermal history of the earth. Gee is also interested in characterizing geomagnetic field behavior in the more distant past through sampling older rocks from a variety of terrestrial settings. Gee received his undergraduate degrees from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA and his Ph.D. from Scripps. He worked for three years as a postdoctoral fellow and researcher at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory before returning to Scripps. 
Gee has served as Director of the Geosciences Research Division and Head of Scripps Earth Section.


Instructor of Term

Susan Schwartz
syschwar@ucsc.edu

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