Course Description

Directed Group Study, POL SCI 198

Directed group study with Political Science faculty.

This online French pilot course is open to UCSD students ONLY.

Key Information

Credit: 4 quarter units / 2.67 semester units credit
UC Irvine, Political Science

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Pending

UC Davis:
Pending

UC Irvine:
Pending

UC Los Angeles:
Pending

UC Merced:
Pending

UC Riverside:
Pending

UC San Diego:
Pending

UC San Francisco:
Pending

UC Santa Barbara:
Pending

UC Santa Cruz:
Pending

More About The Course

Course topics vary.

Course Creator

Daniel Brunstetter

Daniel R. Brunstetter studies political theory, with a focus on early modern thought and just war. His first book, Tensions of Modernity, revisits Europe’s initial encounter with the Native Americans of the New World to shed light on how the West’s initial defense of so-called ‘barbarians’ has influenced the way we think about diversity today, and elucidate the arguments of exclusion that unconsciously permeate the moral world we live in. The main thread of the book traces Bartolomé de Las Casas’s oft heralded defense of the Native Americans in the sixteenth century through the French Enlightenment. While this defense has been rightly lauded as an early example of human rights discourse, tracing Las Casas’s arguments into the eighteenth century shows how his view of equality enabled arguments legitimizing the annihilation by ‘just’ war of those perceived to be ‘barbarians’.

His work on just war thinking spans the historical to the contemporary, including themes such as: the history of the just war tradition, cultural heritage, the contested notion of ‘barbarians’, armed drones, and contemporary debates about the use of force. His work has been published in Ethics & International Affairs, Journal of Military Ethics, Political Studies, Review of International Studies, International Journal of Human Rights, Raisons politiques and elsewhere. He is co-editor of two edited volumes that cover a variety of themes related to the ethics of war: The Ethics of War and Peace Revisited: Moral Challenges in an Era of Contested and Fragmented Sovereignty (w/Georgetown University Press) and Just War Thinkers: From Cicero to the 21st Century (w/Routledge).

His new book Just and Unjust Uses of Limited Force (forthcoming with Oxford University Press) examines the ethics of limited force – what he calls the notion of jus ad vim.

Daniel is currently the Director of UC Irvine’s Center for Citizen Peace Building.  He is currently on the editorial board of the journals Ethics & International Affairs and Champs de Mars.  Daniel was the recipient of a Chateaubriand fellowship in 2005.

Daniel R. Brunstetter studies political theory, with a focus on early modern thought and just war. His first book, Tensions of Modernity , revisits Europe’s initial encounter with the Native Americans of the New World to shed light on how the West’s initial defense of so-called ‘barbarians’ has influenced the way we think about diversity today, and elucidate the arguments of exclusion that ...

Daniel R. Brunstetter studies political theory, with a focus on early modern thought and just war. His first book, Tensions of Modernity, revisits Europe’s initial encounter with the Native Americans of the New World to shed light on how the West’s initial defense of so-called ‘barbarians’ has influenced the way we think about diversity today, and elucidate the arguments of exclusion that unconsciously permeate the moral world we live in. The main thread of the book traces Bartolomé de Las Casas’s oft heralded defense of the Native Americans in the sixteenth century through the French Enlightenment. While this defense has been rightly lauded as an early example of human rights discourse, tracing Las Casas’s arguments into the eighteenth century shows how his view of equality enabled arguments legitimizing the annihilation by ‘just’ war of those perceived to be ‘barbarians’.

His work on just war thinking spans the historical to the contemporary, including themes such as: the history of the just war tradition, cultural heritage, the contested notion of ‘barbarians’, armed drones, and contemporary debates about the use of force. His work has been published in Ethics & International Affairs, Journal of Military Ethics, Political Studies, Review of International Studies, International Journal of Human Rights, Raisons politiques and elsewhere. He is co-editor of two edited volumes that cover a variety of themes related to the ethics of war: The Ethics of War and Peace Revisited: Moral Challenges in an Era of Contested and Fragmented Sovereignty (w/Georgetown University Press) and Just War Thinkers: From Cicero to the 21st Century (w/Routledge).

His new book Just and Unjust Uses of Limited Force (forthcoming with Oxford University Press) examines the ethics of limited force " what he calls the notion of jus ad vim.

Daniel is currently the Director of UC Irvine’s Center for Citizen Peace Building.  He is currently on the editorial board of the journals Ethics & International Affairs and Champs de Mars.  Daniel was the recipient of a Chateaubriand fellowship in 2005.


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