Course Description

Forensic Anthropology, ANTH 103I

This online course teaches the basic analysis of human remains for the medico-legal profession. Covers the development of forensic anthropology, creating a biological profile, evaluating skeletal trauma, estimation of interval since death, and how these assessments can be supported. Students cannot receive credit for this course and for ANTH 103.

Key Information

Credit: 4 quarter units / 2.67 semester units credit
UC Santa Cruz, Anthropology

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Unit Credit

UC Davis:
Unit Credit

UC Irvine:
Unit Credit

UC Los Angeles:
Unit Credit

UC Merced:
units toward degree (see your advisor)

UC Riverside:
General Education: ANTH Elective units

UC San Diego:
General Education: Revelle one course towards Social Science; TMC 1 course toward upper division disciplinary breadth if noncontiguous to major; Warren - May be used depending on major/PofC, Transfer students may use for UD noncontiguous GE depending on major; Sixth - 1 Social Analysis

UC San Francisco:
Unit Credit

UC Santa Barbara:
General Education: This course will apply to Area D automatically upon completion

UC Santa Cruz:
Major Requirement: satisfies upper division requirement for Anthropology majors

Prerequisites

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 102A.

Course Fees

None

Course Creators

Alison Galloway
Alison Galloway (Ph.D. 1988 University of Arizona), Professor, is a physical/biological anthropologist specializing in the study of the human skeleton. Her areas of research include legal aspects of forensic anthropology, rates and processes of decomposition, age-related changes in the skeleton, and analysis of trauma. She is certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology and consults with the coroners/medical examiners for many Central and Northern California counties. Alison Galloway (Ph.D. 1988 University of Arizona), Professor, is a physical/biological anthropologist specializing in the study of the human skeleton. Her areas of research include legal aspects of forensic anthropology, rates and processes of decomposition, age-related changes in the skeleton, and analysis of trauma. She is certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology and ...

Alison Galloway (Ph.D. 1988 University of Arizona), Professor, is a physical/biological anthropologist specializing in the study of the human skeleton. Her areas of research include legal aspects of forensic anthropology, rates and processes of decomposition, age-related changes in the skeleton, and analysis of trauma. She is certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology and consults with the coroners/medical examiners for many Central and Northern California counties.

Cristina Verdugo
Cristina Verdugo is a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her dissertation research focuses on the recovery and analysis of ancient DNA in order to ascertain how mortuary practices are implemented in ancient Maya populations. Verdugo has analyzed human skeletal material recovered from various archaeological projects in the Maya area since 2011. Verdugo also has experience conducting forensic casework analysis alongside Dr. Alison Galloway.  Cristina Verdugo is a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her dissertation research focuses on the recovery and analysis of ancient DNA in order to ascertain how mortuary practices are implemented in ancient Maya populations. Verdugo has analyzed human skeletal material recovered from various archaeological projects in the Maya area since 2011. Verdugo also has ...

Cristina Verdugo is a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her dissertation research focuses on the recovery and analysis of ancient DNA in order to ascertain how mortuary practices are implemented in ancient Maya populations. Verdugo has analyzed human skeletal material recovered from various archaeological projects in the Maya area since 2011. Verdugo also has experience conducting forensic casework analysis alongside Dr. Alison Galloway. 

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