Course Description

Critical Studies in Education, EDUC W190A

This course examines how learning environments can empower and disempower individuals and explores the role of education in the social construction of hierarchy, inequality, difference, identity, and power. It embodies a democratic philosophy and practice, creating a learning community that encourages students to take responsibility for their own education and learn through theory, experience, and dialogue.

Key Information

Credit: 4.5 quarter units / 3 semester units credit
UC Berkeley, Grad School of Education

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.
 
If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
General Education:

American Cultures Requirement


Major Requirement:

Education Minor: Core Class; Interdisciplinary Studies: Discipline requirement; Social Welfare: Secondary Social Sciences Course; Chemistry BS, BA: Satisfies 4 UD units toward College of Letters and Sciences Breadth Requirement



UC Davis:

Unit Credit



UC Irvine:

Unit Credit



UC Los Angeles:

Unit Credit



UC Merced:

Unit Credit



UC Riverside:
General Education:

Elective units



UC San Diego:
General Education:

TMC 1 course toward upper division disciplinary breadth if noncontiguous to major; Warren - May be counted depending on major/PofC/AS; Transfer students may use for UD noncontiguous GE depending on major; Revelle - one course towards Social Science; Sixth - none



UC San Francisco:

Unit Credit



UC Santa Barbara:

Unit Credit



UC Santa Cruz:
Pending

Course Creators

Erin Murphy-Graham

Erin Murphy-Graham works in the field of comparative and international education. Her research focuses on three inter-related areas: 1) the process by which education can foster the empowerment of girls and women, and the theorization of what empowerment entails; 2) the role of education in changing how students relate to others, particularly in their intimate relationships and in building trust; 3) the rigorous evaluation of educational programs that have demonstrated potential to empower youth and adults in Latin America. She is currently engaged in a longitudinal mixed methods study investigating the impact of a sports-based life skills training program for youth in Guatemala and Honduras.

Dr. Murphy-Graham is the author of Opening Minds, Improving Lives: Education and Women's Empowerment in Honduras (Vanderbilt University Press, Spring 2012) and her articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Education Review, International Journal of Educational Development, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, International Review of Education, Gender and Education, and the American Journal of Evaluation

Prior to joining the faculty at Berkeley, Dr. Murphy-Graham was an Assistant Professor of International Education at New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. She has worked as a consultant to government agencies and NGOs in Honduras, Colombia, Nicaragua, and the Caribbean. At Berkeley, she teaches courses on education and international development and qualitative research methods.

Erin Murphy-Graham works in the field of comparative and international education. Her research focuses on three inter-related areas: 1) the process by which education can foster the empowerment of girls and women, and the theorization of what empowerment entails; 2) the role of education in changing how students relate to others, particularly in their intimate relationships and in building ...

Erin Murphy-Graham works in the field of comparative and international education. Her research focuses on three inter-related areas: 1) the process by which education can foster the empowerment of girls and women, and the theorization of what empowerment entails; 2) the role of education in changing how students relate to others, particularly in their intimate relationships and in building trust; 3) the rigorous evaluation of educational programs that have demonstrated potential to empower youth and adults in Latin America. She is currently engaged in a longitudinal mixed methods study investigating the impact of a sports-based life skills training program for youth in Guatemala and Honduras.

Dr. Murphy-Graham is the author of Opening Minds, Improving Lives: Education and Women's Empowerment in Honduras (Vanderbilt University Press, Spring 2012) and her articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Education Review, International Journal of Educational Development, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, International Review of Education, Gender and Education, and the American Journal of Evaluation

Prior to joining the faculty at Berkeley, Dr. Murphy-Graham was an Assistant Professor of International Education at New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. She has worked as a consultant to government agencies and NGOs in Honduras, Colombia, Nicaragua, and the Caribbean. At Berkeley, she teaches courses on education and international development and qualitative research methods.


Christyna Serrano
Dr. Christyna Serrano is a graduate of the Policy, Organizations, Measurement, and Evaluation (POME) program in the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley. Her dissertation examined the implementation of a federal policy (the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010) and its implementation at the local level (the Oakland Unified School District). While a graduate student at UC Berkeley, Christyna co-designed and was the instructor of record for "Critical Studies in Education" (ED 190) from 2013-2016. During the 2016-2017 academic year, she designed an online version of ED 190, which she piloted in the Summer of 2016 and will also be teaching during the Spring 2018 semester. Dr. Serrano currently works at Kapi`olani Community College in the Office for Institutional Effectiveness as an institutional researcher and in instructional assessment and evaluation.   Dr. Christyna Serrano is a graduate of the Policy, Organizations, Measurement, and Evaluation (POME) program in the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley. Her dissertation examined the implementation of a federal policy (the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010) and its implementation at the local level (the Oakland Unified School District). While a graduate student at UC Berkeley, ...

Dr. Christyna Serrano is a graduate of the Policy, Organizations, Measurement, and Evaluation (POME) program in the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley. Her dissertation examined the implementation of a federal policy (the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010) and its implementation at the local level (the Oakland Unified School District). While a graduate student at UC Berkeley, Christyna co-designed and was the instructor of record for "Critical Studies in Education" (ED 190) from 2013-2016. During the 2016-2017 academic year, she designed an online version of ED 190, which she piloted in the Summer of 2016 and will also be teaching during the Spring 2018 semester. Dr. Serrano currently works at Kapi`olani Community College in the Office for Institutional Effectiveness as an institutional researcher and in instructional assessment and evaluation.  

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