Course Description

Ecosystems of California, BIOE 125

A survey of the diversity, structure, and functioning of California's ecosystems through time and the ways they have influenced and responded to human activities and stewardship. Topics include: ecosystem drivers such as climate, soils, and land-use history; human and ecological prehistory; comparative marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics; and managed ecosystems such as range, fisheries, and agriculture.

Key Information

Credit: 5 quarter units / 3.33 semester units credit
UC Santa Cruz, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Unit Credit

UC Davis:
Unit Credit

UC Irvine:
Unit Credit

UC Los Angeles:
Unit Credit

UC Merced:
Units toward degree (see your advisor)

UC Riverside:
Unit Credit

UC San Diego:
Unit Credit

UC San Francisco:
Pending

UC Santa Barbara:
Unit Credit

UC Santa Cruz:
Course Equivalence: ENVS 125

Course Video

Prerequisites

Prerequisite(s): course 20C. Enrollment restricted to ecology and evolution, marine biology, plant sciences, and biology B.A. majors.

Course Fees

Purchase of online or hard-copy version of textbook is the only additional cost of the course.

More About The Course

This course is identified as both BIOE 125 and ENVS 125.
There are 25 video field trips and three data analysis and lab write-up workshops.

Relevant Website

Course Creator

Erika Zavaleta
Erika Zavaleta is a professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at the University of California at Santa Cruz. She and her research group study the drivers and consequences of changing biological diversity and the role of ecology in guiding effective conservation practice. Recent and current projects address the effects of climate variability and change on endemic California oak populations; the 150-year reconstruction of cumulative nitrogen pollution effects on remnant grassland ecosystems; the effects of climate-driven species losses on serpentine grassland functioning; the need for climate adaptation planning processes, particularly for the state of California; and the global case for ecosystem-based climate adaptation as an alternative to hard-engineered approaches.

In most of her work, Erika strives to bridge ecological theory, training and research to sound conservation and management practice. To that end, her research incorporates collaboration with conservation practitioners and elements of economics, public policy, and anthropology. From 2001-2003, Erika was a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow of the Nature Conservancy. In 2004-05 she spent a one-year leave working in the philanthropic sector as program ecologist for The Christensen Fund.
 
Erika completed a BA and MA in Anthropology (1995) and a PhD in Biological Sciences (2001) at Stanford University. She was a recipient of the Ecological Society of America’s Sustainability Science Award in 2008 and has authored or co-authored ~75 papers and book chapters in ecology and social science. She lives in Santa Cruz and enjoys life outdoors with her husband and wee ones (ages 21, 11, 7, and 4).
Erika Zavaleta is a professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at the University of California at Santa Cruz. She and her research group study the drivers and consequences of changing biological diversity and the role of ecology in guiding effective conservation practice. Recent and current projects address the effects of climate variability and change on endemic California ...

Erika Zavaleta is a professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at the University of California at Santa Cruz. She and her research group study the drivers and consequences of changing biological diversity and the role of ecology in guiding effective conservation practice. Recent and current projects address the effects of climate variability and change on endemic California oak populations; the 150-year reconstruction of cumulative nitrogen pollution effects on remnant grassland ecosystems; the effects of climate-driven species losses on serpentine grassland functioning; the need for climate adaptation planning processes, particularly for the state of California; and the global case for ecosystem-based climate adaptation as an alternative to hard-engineered approaches.

In most of her work, Erika strives to bridge ecological theory, training and research to sound conservation and management practice. To that end, her research incorporates collaboration with conservation practitioners and elements of economics, public policy, and anthropology. From 2001-2003, Erika was a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow of the Nature Conservancy. In 2004-05 she spent a one-year leave working in the philanthropic sector as program ecologist for The Christensen Fund.
 
Erika completed a BA and MA in Anthropology (1995) and a PhD in Biological Sciences (2001) at Stanford University. She was a recipient of the Ecological Society of America’s Sustainability Science Award in 2008 and has authored or co-authored ~75 papers and book chapters in ecology and social science. She lives in Santa Cruz and enjoys life outdoors with her husband and wee ones (ages 21, 11, 7, and 4).

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