Course Description

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, CHEM W109C

Structure, reactivity and synthesis of organic molecules including nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, and stereochemistry. Topics include organometallics, polymers, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, coenzymes and their mechanisms.

Key Information

Credit: 4 quarter units / 2.67 semester units credit
UC Santa Barbara, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Course Credit:

Upon successful completion, all online courses offered through cross-enrollment provide UC unit credit. Some courses are approved for GE, major preparation and/or, major credit or can be used as a substitute for a course at your campus.

If "unit credit" is listed by your campus, consult your department, academic adviser or Student Affairs division to inquire about the petition process for more than unit credit for the course.

UC Berkeley:
Unit Credit

UC Davis:
Unit Credit

UC Irvine:
Course Equivalence: CHEM 51C

UC Los Angeles:
Upper division; units toward degree 

UC Merced:
Course Equivalence: UC Merced CHEM 100
# of Units (see your advisor)

UC Riverside:
General Education: CHEM Elective units

UC San Diego:
General Education: Warren - May be counted depending on major/PofC, Transfer students may use for UD noncontiguous depending on major;

UC Santa Barbara:
General Education: Satisfies breadth requirement for College of Creative Studies
Major Requirement: Organic Chemistry (CHEM W 109C) is required for chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical engineering majors. The course is also required for many majors in the biological sciences, including (i) Cell and Developmental Biology, (ii) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, (iii) Microbiology, (iv) Physiology, and (v) Pharmacology. It is also required for some graduate programs such as the combined BS-Chemistry/MS-Materials program. In addition, students planning a career in the health professions are required by the professional schools to take this course regardless of their major.

UC Santa Cruz:
Unit Credit

Prerequisites

Chemistry 109B or 109BH with a minimum grade of C-.

Course Fees

None

More About The Course

Technology Recommendations:
The course utilizes standard technologies present in most modern operating systems and browsers. A meeting to discuss technical requirements will take place about a month before beginning of the course. For the best on-line experience, you want:
(1) A modern desktop or high-end laptop computer running a recent version of Windows, MacOS, or Linux. Computers in campus computer labs are well suited for this class. Many course components can be also accessed from tablet computers running Android 4.4 or newer, iOS 7 or newer, or Windows Phone 8.1 or newer.
(2) A display of least 1280×800 (WXGA) to avoid horizontal scrolling. I strongly recommend a display at least 1920 pixels wide (HD) to allows simultaneous views of the discussion window and the course website. Dual-monitor setup is ideal. Please note that your experience on many smaller netbooks will be sub-optimal.
(3) Working speakers, a microphone, and a high-definition (at least 1280×720) webcam. An HD camcorder may also work as a webcam.
(4) GPU-accelerated VP8 and Flash video decoding. For smooth video playback, I recommend that your video card is NVIDIA GeForce 600-series “Kepler” or newer, or AMD Radeon HD 7900-series “Southern Islands” or newer, or Intel HD 5300 “Broadwell” or higher.
(5) A modern up-to-date Firefox, Chrome, or Opera browser (for Safari and IE10, you need to install the WebM codec). MS Edge probably will work, too. Please make sure that a recent version of Adobe Flash is installed and enabled.
(6) Reliable high-bandwidth internet connection. Computers with wired connection to the campus network, a residential fiber optic network, or to a cable internet modem will be ideal. If you rely on Wi-Fi at home, please consider a dual-band router to relieve bandwidth congestion. While many course activities can be accessed via LTE mobile connections, mobile connections are not suitable for watching high-resolution course videos and participating in course discussions.

Relevant Website

Course Creators

Kalju Kahn
Dr. Kahn obtained his Diploma (Cum Laude) in Chemistry from the University of Tartu in 1992. He continued his research at the same institution in the laboratory of Professor Mati Karelson and received M.S. in Chemistry in 1994. After serving as a mentor for the 26th International Chemistry Olympiad, he joined the Ph.D. program at the University of Missouri-Columbia working with Dr. Peter Tipton on the mechanism of urate oxidase. He was awarded Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry in 1998. Dr. Kahn joined the research group of Professor Thomas C. Bruice in 1998.  His post-doctoral research focused on application of computational techniques to better understand enzyme catalysis. 

Dr. Kahn started his teaching career in 2001 by developing a series of lab courses for the new Biochemistry Major program at UCSB.  Over the past years he has taught a variety of lecture classes, including Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Drug Design, Enzyme Mechanisms, Chemical Kinetics, Biophysical Chemistry and Computational Chemistry as well as a series of biochemistry laboratory courses in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the UCSB.  Since 2012, Dr Kahn has been teaching a fully on-line Biochemistry Lecture course each Summer.  He is excited to teach a much more challenging Organic Chemistry course second time as a fully on-line course during Winter 2017!  
Dr. Kahn obtained his Diploma (Cum Laude) in Chemistry from the University of Tartu in 1992. He continued his research at the same institution in the laboratory of Professor Mati Karelson and received M.S. in Chemistry in 1994. After serving as a mentor for the 26th International Chemistry Olympiad, he joined the Ph.D. program at the University of Missouri-Columbia working with Dr. Peter ...

Dr. Kahn obtained his Diploma (Cum Laude) in Chemistry from the University of Tartu in 1992. He continued his research at the same institution in the laboratory of Professor Mati Karelson and received M.S. in Chemistry in 1994. After serving as a mentor for the 26th International Chemistry Olympiad, he joined the Ph.D. program at the University of Missouri-Columbia working with Dr. Peter Tipton on the mechanism of urate oxidase. He was awarded Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry in 1998. Dr. Kahn joined the research group of Professor Thomas C. Bruice in 1998.  His post-doctoral research focused on application of computational techniques to better understand enzyme catalysis. 

Dr. Kahn started his teaching career in 2001 by developing a series of lab courses for the new Biochemistry Major program at UCSB.  Over the past years he has taught a variety of lecture classes, including Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Drug Design, Enzyme Mechanisms, Chemical Kinetics, Biophysical Chemistry and Computational Chemistry as well as a series of biochemistry laboratory courses in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the UCSB.  Since 2012, Dr Kahn has been teaching a fully on-line Biochemistry Lecture course each Summer.  He is excited to teach a much more challenging Organic Chemistry course second time as a fully on-line course during Winter 2017!  

Morgan Gainer
Dr. Gainer received his B.S. in Chemistry from Brigham Young University in 2007 and his PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Utah in 2013. His graduate work was performed in the laboratory of Dr. Ryan Looper and focused on the use of metal salts to catalyze the regioselective cyclization of propargyl guanidines, allowing for the facile synthesis of biologically relevant alkaloids. He began his teaching career at UC Santa Barbara in 2013, and continues to teach Chem 109A, 109B, and 109C.
 
Dr. Gainer is the current director for undergraduate organic laboratory instruction. Dr. Gainer has worked hard to revitalize the organic chemistry labs at UCSB. Under Dr. Gainer’s direction existing labs have been updated to be more reliable and engaging, as-well-as implemented the use of new, more modern experiments. He regularly employs the use of technology in the classroom environment, including iClickers and Learning Glass, as a means to motivate and engage students learning organic chemistry.
Dr. Gainer received his B.S. in Chemistry from Brigham Young University in 2007 and his PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Utah in 2013. His graduate work was performed in the laboratory of Dr. Ryan Looper and focused on the use of metal salts to catalyze the regioselective cyclization of propargyl guanidines, allowing for the facile synthesis of biologically relevant alkaloids. ...

Dr. Gainer received his B.S. in Chemistry from Brigham Young University in 2007 and his PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Utah in 2013. His graduate work was performed in the laboratory of Dr. Ryan Looper and focused on the use of metal salts to catalyze the regioselective cyclization of propargyl guanidines, allowing for the facile synthesis of biologically relevant alkaloids. He began his teaching career at UC Santa Barbara in 2013, and continues to teach Chem 109A, 109B, and 109C.
 
Dr. Gainer is the current director for undergraduate organic laboratory instruction. Dr. Gainer has worked hard to revitalize the organic chemistry labs at UCSB. Under Dr. Gainer’s direction existing labs have been updated to be more reliable and engaging, as-well-as implemented the use of new, more modern experiments. He regularly employs the use of technology in the classroom environment, including iClickers and Learning Glass, as a means to motivate and engage students learning organic chemistry.

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